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THE MUSE 



THE YEAR-BOOK OF THE STUDENTS 

OF ST. MARY'S SCHOOL, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




Volume VIII. 1905-06. 

Published by the Senior Class. 



Edwards & Broughton 

Printers and Binders 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



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Alma Mater. 



Tune : " Believe me if all thoie endearing youns charmi. " 

St. Mary's ! wherever thy daughters may be, 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling. 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name ; 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course ! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove, 
And cany thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 



'Most potent, grave and reverend seigniors.' 

The Board of Trustees. 



The Bishops. 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D - Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D ^Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Ellison Capers, D.D. Columbia, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical and Lay Trustees. 
North Carolina. 

Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D.D., Salisbury. Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 

Rev. Julian E. Ingle, Henderson. W. A. Erwin", Durham. 

Rev. M. M. Marshall, D.D., Raleigh. Charles E. Johnson, Raleigh. 

Richard H. Battle, LL.D., Raleigh. David Y. Cooper, Henderson. 

East Carolina. 

Rev. Robt. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Col. JohnW. Atkinson, Wilmington. 
Rev. T. M. N. George, New Berne. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

South Carolina. 

Rev. W. P. Witsell, B. D., Columbia. H. P. Duval, Cheraw. 
Rev. H. J. Mikell, B.D., Charleston. P. T. Hayne, Greenville. 

Asheville. 

Rev. T. C. Wetmore, Arden. Col. T. F. Davidson, Asheville. 

Rev. Walter Hughson, Morganton. F. A. Clinard, Hickory. 

Executive Committee. 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D. 
Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D.D. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Chas. E. Johnson. W. A. Erwin. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 

7 




Alma Mater. 



Tune : " Believe me if all those endearing young chums." 

St. Mary's ! wherever thy daughters may be, 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling. 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name ; 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove, 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 



'Most potent, grave and reverend seigniors." 

The Board of Trustees. 



The Bishops. 

Kt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D.D ^ Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Robt. Strange, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Ellison Capers, D.D. Columbia, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Clerical and Lay Trustees. 
North Carolina. 

Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D.D., Salisbury. Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh. 

Rev. Julian E. Ingle, Henderson. W. A. Erwin, Durham. 

Rev. M. M. Marshall, D.D., Raleigh. Charles E. Johnson, Raleigh. 

Richard H. Battle, LL.D., Raleigh. David Y. Cooper, Henderson. 

East Carolina. 

Rev. Robt. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton. Cot. John W. Atkinson, Wilmington. 
Rev. T. M. N. George, New Berne. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

South Carolina. 

Rev. W. P. Witsell, B. D., Columbia. H. P. Duval, Cheraw. 
Rev. H. J. Mikell, B.D., Charleston. P. T. Hayne, Greenville. 

Asheville. 

Rev. T. C. Wetmore, Arden. Col. T. F. Davidson, Asheville. 

Rev. Walter Hughson, Morganton. F. A. Clinard, Hickory. 

Executive Committee. 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D. 
Rev. F. J. Murdoch, D.D. Dr. R. H. Lewis. 

Chas. E. Johnson. W. A. Erwin. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr. 

7 



The Officers of Administration and Instruction, 

io,ocj-'o6. 

Rev. McNEELY DuBOSE, Rector. 

What great ones do, the less will prattle of. 
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. 

Mrs. McNEELY DuBOSE, School Mother. 

There's nought In this bad world like sympathy; 
'Tls so becoming to the soul and face. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, Secretary. 

How various his employments. 

The Academic Faculty. 

The choice and master-spirita of this age. 

Rev. McNEELY DuBOSE, B.S., B.D., Bible and Ethics. 

His preaching much, but more his practice wrought. 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS, A.M., English and Literature. 

Whence is thy eo great learning? 

WILLIAM E. STONE, A.B. (Harvard), .... History and English. 

Reading maketh a full man. writing an exact man. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK, A.M., Latin and Science. 

docendo dlscimus. 

KATE C. SHIPP (Teachers' Dipl. Camb.), Mathematics. 

Now she by geometric scale could take the size of pots of ale. 

ANNA M. MASCH, French and German. 

Abondance de bien ne nuit pas. 

YANITA CRIBBS (Univ. Ala.), . . . Elocution and Physical Culture. 

And when she spake, sweet words, like dropping honey, she did shed. 
She does allot for every exercise a several hour. 

KATE McKIMMON (St. Mary's), . . . Primary School and Study Hall. 

Thou knowest bow fearless is our trust in thee. 

LOUISE PITTENGER (St. Mary's), Preparatory Work. 

And gladly wolde she learn and gladly teche. 

KATE deR. MEARES (St. Mary's ; U. N. O), . . . Preparatory Work. 

The languages— especially the dead ; the arts— at least all such as could be said. 






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The School of Music. 
W. H. SANBORN (Leipzig), Director Piano, Organ, Theory. 

Bidding my organ obey, calling its keys to their work; 
- Claiming each slave of the sound at a touch, armies of angels. 

MARTHA A. DOWD (St. Mary's), .... Piano, Elementary Theory. 

Untwisting all the chains that tie the hidden soul of harmony. 

CHELIAN AGNES PIXLEY Piano. 

Uer music vibrates in the memory. 

Mks. JESSAMINE HARRISON-IRVINE, Piano. 

She could discourse most eloquent music. 

CHARLOTTE KENDALL HULL (Chicago), Violin. 

As sweet and musical as bright Apollo's lute. 

Mrs. W. H. SANBORN (Leipzig), Vocal Training. 

She knew herself to sing and build the lofty rhyme. 

GERTRUDE E. SANBORN Assistant in Vocal Training. 

Her voice was like the warbling of a bird. 

The School of Art. 
CLARA FENNER (Maryland Institute), Director. 

I can do with my pencil what I know, what I see, what at bottom of my heart I wish for. 

The School of Business. 
LIZZIE H. LEE, Principal. 

Business dispatched is business well-done, but business hurried is business ill-done. 

JULIET B. SUTTON, Assistant. 

No where so busy a one as she there was. 

Mrs. MARY L. SEAY, Housekeeper. 

The turnpike road to people's hearts, I find, lies thro' their mouths. 

LOLA E. WALTON, Matron of Infirmary. 

When pain and anguish wring the brow, a ministering angel thou I 

ANNE SAUNDERS, Chaperon. 

To undertake her duties, pray, where could we rind her equal? 

LIZZIE H. LEE, Bookkeeper. 

Of keeping many books there is 110 end. 

JULIET B. SUTTON, Stenographer. 

I have tamed that savage stenographic mystery. 
9 



•2 



The Class of 1906. 



Colors : Dark Blue and Old Gold. Flower : Pans} 7 . 

Motto : Boni milites bonam militiam. 




The Class Officers. 

President and Historian FRANCES E. WOOLF. 

Vice-President, JANE IREDELL GREEN. 

Secretary and Poet MARGARET MACKAY. 

Treasurer and Prophet ANNIE W. SLOAN. 

10 




THE HONORARY MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF 1906, 
Miss Eleanor W. Thomas. 



1 They are true friends who will neither Hatter nor dissemble." 




RUTH FOSTER, St. Simon's Mills, Ga, 

Without or with offense to friends or foes 
I sketch the world exactly as it goes. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Secretary-Treasurer Class. 

Altar Guild. 

St. Etlieldreda's Chapter. 

Choral Society. 

E A II Literary Society. 

Olympic Athletic Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Teller E A II Literary Society. 

Altar Guild. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Choral Society. 

Muse Club. 

Editor-in-Chief Monthly Muse. 

Editor-in-Chief Annual Muse. 



JANE IREDELL GREEN, TBS, 



Wilmington. 



But ivhen you see in one combined charms such as 

do in you exist, 
And ff well-cultivated mind — her magic poioer who 

can resist? 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Secretary St. Anne's Chapter. 
2 A Literary Society. 
Altar Guild.* 
Corinthian Athletic Club. 
L'Etoile German Club. 
Wilmington Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Vice-President Class. 

Secretary 2 A Literary Society. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

Dramatic Club. 

Athletic Association. 

Muse Club. 

Chapel Usher. 

Inter-Society Debater. 

Business Manager Monthly Muse. 

Business Manager Annual Muse. 

W. M. T. E. 

Walking Club. 





ANNIE ELIZA KOONCE, Richlands. 

The chief of all perfections to be plain and brief. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

E A n Literary Society. 

SENIOR YEAB. 

E A n Literary Society. 
Social Editor Monthly Muse. 
Literary Editor Annual Muse. 



MARY THORNTON LASSITEK, T A, Hertford. 

The deepest rivers flow with the least sound. 

JUNIOR TEAR. 

St. Etheldreda's Chapter. 
Altar Guild. 
Tennis Club. 
Corinthian Athletic Club. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

President Altar Guild. 

President St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Walking Club. 

Tennis Club. 

Muse Club. 

Literary Editor Monthly Muse. 

Literary Editor Annual Muse. 





MARGARET DEVEREUX MACKAY, 

There was a soft and pensive grace, 
A cast of thought upon her face, 
That suited well the forehead high, 
The eyelash dark and downcast eye. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

2 A Literary Society. 
Secretary Class. 

SENIOR YEAH. 

Secretary Class. 

Class Poet. 

Inter- Society Debater. 

2 A Literary Society. 

Associate Editor Monthly Muse. 

Literary Editor Annual Muse. 



Raleigh. 



HARRIETTS ELIZABETH RUFE, Ridgeway, S. C. 

Hast so much wit and mirth and spleen about 

thee, 
There is no living with thee or without thee. 

JUNIOR TEAR. 

St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

Choral Class. 

South Carolina Club. 

Corinthian Athletic Club. 

Tennis Club. 

SENIOR TEAR. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

E. A. P. Literary Society. 

South Carolina Club. 

Tennis Club. 

Walking Club. 

Choral Class. 

Muse Club. 

Light Editor Monthly Muse. 

Art Editor Annual Muse. 




ANNIE WHETHER SLOAN, 



Columbia, S. C. 




Then rising with Aurora's light, 

The Muse invoiced, sits down to write. 

JUNIOR TEAS. 

St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

Choral Class. 

Tennis Club. 

Corinthian Athletic Club. 

South Carolina Club. 

Teller E A n Literary Society. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Altar Guild. 

Secretary-Treasurer South Carolina Club. 

Treasurer of Class. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Historian E A II Society. 

Choral Class. 

Walking Club. 

Tennis Club. 

Class Prophet. 

Muse Club. 

Exchange Editor Monthly Muse. 

Art Editor Annual Muse. 



SARA GERTRUDE SULLIVAN, TBS, Savannah, Ga. 
She is pretty to walk with, witty to talk with, 
and pleasant to be with. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Treasurer E A n, '04. 

Vice-President E A II, '05. 

Altar Guild. 

Vice-President Dramatic Club. 

Olympic Athletic Club. 

St. Etheldreda's Chapter. 

Tennis Club. 

L'Etoile German Club. 

Junior Marshal. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

President E A n Literary Society. 

Secretary-Treasurer Dramatic Club. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

Athletic Association. 

W. M. T. E. 

Tennis Club. 

Literary Editor Monthly Muse. 

Literary Editor Annual Muse. 




M 



KM\t 




FRANCES ELIZABETH WOOLF, K A, 

Demopolis, Ala. 
Every winning grace that love demands. 

JUNIOB YEAB. 

President of Class. 

Vice-President E A II Literary Society, 1904. 

Critic F. A n Society, 1905. 

Secretary St. Etheldreda's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

Tau Delta German Club. 

Olympic Athletic Club. 

Chief Marshal. 

SENIOR YEAH. 

President of Class. 

Sec. E A H Literary Society. 

Inter-Society Debater. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. 

Altar Guild. 

Chapel Usher. 

Dramatic Club. 

W. M. T. E. 

Muse Club. 

Athletic Association. 

Associate Editor Monthly Muse. 

Art Editor Annual Muse. 



A 



Sad History of the Class. 



The Story o( the Naughty-Six Girls. 

CROSS the way is a Picture. It tells about the 
Naughty-Six Girls. The Tree is the Tree 
of Knowledge. See the Nine Hats on the 
Tree and the Nine Foot-prints in the Sand. «. 



These are Their Hats and Their Foot-prints. Most 
of the branches are broken off the Tree. They broke 
them off and took them with Them. 

They were Forty little "Greenies" when they 
stepped over Freshman Bump. See it in the picture. 
They were Thirty, sick with Big Head, when they 
passed over Sophomore Hillock. You can see that 
in the Picture too. Only Twenty got well enough to 
stroll over Junior Hill. Six of these were lost in the 
Valley of Pleasure. That house in the Picture. That 
is the House of Pleasure. Many went in there and 
never came back. See those black things on Senior 
Mountain. They are the Graves of those who were 
killed by the Monster, Exam. Only Nine got away, 
but They went on. They had many a fall climbing 
Senior Mountain. At last they got to the foot. Then 
they passed over Muse River. (The Picture doesn't 
show what a bad river it is). They hung up their 
Caps for the Juniors and then went away into the 
world. (This place is not in the Picture). They 
made those foot-prints when they were going. That 
is the end of the Story. 



euss f e@i best 





I WAS glancing over my latest manuscript one bright May morn- 
ing, I received a note. It was from Margaret Mackay, saying the class 
of nineteen-six were to have a reunion at the St. Mary's Commence- 
ment, 1956. Getting into my airship, I told my conductor to take 
me to North Carolina immediately; as we were twenty minutes on 
the way, I was almost wearied out when we arrived. At first sight of the old 
grove I hardly recognized it, so changed was it. There were three new dormi- 
tories, a beautiful new stone chapel, and so many improvements that I haven't 
space enough to give them honorable mention. As it was Saturday night, 
Margaret suggested our having a "Muse" meeting, saying that for once we 
could all have something to say in relating what had happened to us in the 
intervening years. 

Ret Ruff got in on an electric car, just in time for roll-call, but I hardly 
recognized her so long and thick was the mass of white hair she had piled up 
on top of her head. Of course you understand we were all old ladies, and I 
wish you to understand too that we had never lost the dignity we acquired 
when Seniors. The library was so large and impressive that we of the class 
of nineteen-six started back in awe and decided to have the meeting in the 
kindergarten adjoining it. After twenty minutes' wait, Mr. Cruikshank 
appeared with the roll book, but you would hardly have recognized him in 
the tottering old man with the long white beard. " Miss Foster," he said in 
a feeble voice. For a long time no answer, then a child in the back of the 
room said: "Auntie told me to tell you she couldn't come because she loved the 
dear old state of Georgia and had a will of her own." We all smiled and 
then the venerable sage went on. "Miss Lassiter — is she here?" A white 
haired little lady at the far end of the table arose. " Yes," she said, " here at 
last, but I must hurry, as I am going to speak to the girls in the chapel at 8:30 
o'clock. After my St. Mary's years I went to the Mission School in New York 



and am still there where I fill Miss Jarvis' place. Oh, girls! it is such a nice 
work." "Miss Green." No answer, a long time a silence, and then Margaret 
told in a choking voice that Jane Iredell had married a widower with two 
children. They all spoke in Latin, and the smartest girl in our class had at 
last succumbed to her fate, her last words being "0, me afflictum — 0, me per- 
ditum/" After this, we all shed a silent tear and then the roll went on. 
"Miss Ruff." "Oh!" that lad)' said rising, "would you believe it, girls? I 
married a hair doctor — he is the nicest thing, and my marrying was so funny 
because I never cared for men." "Miss Sloan." I arose with dignity and 
told them that I was so pleased with myself as Miss Pole when we had our 
Senior play, "Cranford," in that memorable year, nineteen hundred and six, 
that I never married. "But," I added in an excited voice, "' The Pathfin- 
der' has accepted two of my stories and I am so happy." "Beg pardon, Miss 
Koonce," Mr. Cruikshank said, "but my eyes are growing so dim I can hardly 
see — may we hear from you now?" Annie rose timidly and said blushing, 
"I was married last year to a wealthy farmer; before then I taught in the 
public schools of Raleigh — I am now blissfully happy." We did not deny 
this and Mr. Cruikshank went on. "Miss Woolf." The President of our 
class arose ; she was a very handsome old lady, but who that knew her in her 
youth would have thought it? "I am keeping a kindergarten," she said, 
adjusting her glasses, and peeping over them to see if we approved. "My 
love for children is still increasing. I have adopted three, and am now think- 
ing of adopting a pair of twins. They are very bad sometimes, but then 
almost all of the time, they are little clears." " Miss Sullivan, my glasses are so 
dim." Mr. Cruikshank was becoming very tired. When he had revived, 
Gertrude told her story. "After St. Mary's days," she said, "I went to Smith 
College, and took a higher course in history. I married a professor, but as I 
never could converse on American presidents and that kind of thing, we 
couldn't agree." Margaret Mackay then got up. "My story is such a sad 
one, girls, that I told Mr. Cruikshank to call my name last." The old gen- 
tleman referred to bowed his acquiesience and sighed deeply. " I went into a 
whirl of society and after rejecting many offers of marriage finally accepted a 
sailor. He was drowned at sea shortly afterward." The poor lady broke 
down. Just then a little colored girl filled our glasses and we all responded 
heartily to Betty Woolf 's toast—" Here's to the class of 1906." 



Class Poem. 




Through sun and shade and stormy weather, 
We've worked and played, dear friends, together, 
And wisdom's paths we've sought — 

And now when comes the parting hour, 
To you I bring this little flower, 
A pansy, 'tis for thought. 



)-W 



In mingled hues of dark and gold 

Does this our chosen flower unfold, 

And thus our life shall run — 

But come there cloud or come there Bhower, 
This lesson we have from our pansy flower, 
"Look upward for the sun." 




4fc 

The Certificate Pupils of 1905-06. 




SEEENA COBIA BAILEY, 

Piano. 



Palatka, Fla, 



LAURA BAKER, Brunswick, Ga. 

Piano. 




■}. 




MARTHA BRIGMAN, 



English. 




JOSEPHINE ENGLEHARD BOYLAN, K A Raleigh. 
English Diploma. 



Rockingham. 




VIRGINIA EMPIE BAILEY, A K * Wilmington. 

English. 
Piano. 



CAROLINE NELSON deROSSET, 
Business Course. 
Piano. 



Wilmington. 




NANCY FAIRLEY, 




MYRTLE LOUISE DISOSWAY, 

English Diploma. 
Piano. 



English Diploma. 
Mathematics. 



Rockingham. 



New Berne. 




',,; 



1 




KATHARINE TALBOTT GARY, 

Business Course. 



Henderson. 






EULA HITE GREGORY, 

English Diploma. 



Henderson. 





"'->--_Ai 



>• 



MARY CHRISTINE KLINGENSMITH, K A 

Blairsville, Pa. 
Typewriting. 



ROWENA LEE, 



Clinton. 



Elocution. 





MARY MEMUCAN PERRY, 

English Diploma. 



Henderson. 



LEONORE WHEAT SEAY, 
Art. 



Raleigh. 



English Diploma. 




Jttmurs 'tiB 




The Class of 1907. 

Colors : White and Gold. Flower : Daisy. 

Motto : Tenax propositi. 

LILLIAN PARMER, President. 

EMILY CARRISON, Vice-President. 

LEONORE SEAY, Sec'y-Treasurer. 

HELEN BALL. HEBEE BIRDSONG. 

KATIE BARBEE. EMILY CARRISON. 

BLAND BOWEN. LILLIAN FABMi.ll. 

BEATRICE COHEN. JESSIE HARRIS. 

EULA GREGORY. MARY PERRY. 

ALICE MoCULLERS. GRACE WHTTAKER. 

LEONORE SEAY. 

38 




The Class of 1908 

Coloes : Black and Gold. Flower : Sweet-pea. 

Motto : Step by step we gain the height. 

ELIZABETH WADDILL, President. 

LOUISE HILL, Vice-President. 

SAEA JONES, Secretary. 

Sophomore Roll. 

MARY GRIMES COWPER. 

JULIET CREWS. ELLEN DUVALL. 

NELLIE FORT. S LOUISE HILL 

BERTHA HOLMAN. LILLIAN HUGHES. 

BESSIE IVEY. SARA JONES. 

SADIEBELLE McGWIGAN. FRANKIE SELF. 
LOTTIE SHARP. MARGUERITE SHORT. 
ELIZABETH WADDILL. 





The Class of 1909. 



Colors : Green and Gold. Flower : Golden Rod 

Motto : Esse quam videri. 

ELLA CROFT, President. 

NANNIE MOORE, Vice-President. 

JULIA McINTYRE, Secretary. 

GENEVIEVE COOPER, Treasurer. 



SALLIE HAYWOOD BATTLE. 
HELEN BEEiiDEN. 
KATIE COKE. 
ELLA CROFT. 
GENEVIEVE COOPER. 
EMILr CLARKSON. 
ALICE CORBETT. 
DEE DUNCAN. 
GRACE DEATON. 
NATHALIE DOTTERER. 
CORINNA GANT. 
GLADYS HARRIS. 
ANNIE HUTCHISON. 



Freshman Roll. 

GEORGIA HALES. 
GLADYS HUFF. 
KATHARINE HENDERSON. 
JESSIE JENNINGS. 
HELEN LIDDELL.* 
KATIE LOANE. 
FRANCES LEE. 
FRANCES McKEE. 
JULIA McINTYRE. 
CARLOTTA MEWBORN. 
ANNE MILLER. 
HAZLE MIDDLETON. 
NANNIE MOORE. 
JENNIE MORRIS. 



MARY PETERSON. 
ELOISE ROBINSON. 
EVA ROGERSON. 
VIRGINIA SAUNDERS. 
EVELYN SIMPSON. 
MARION SLOCOMB. 
MAKIA TUCKER. 
MYRTLE TROUTMAN. 
GRACE WARD. 
ELIZABETH WATTS. 
ANNIE WELLS. 
ELNORA WILLIAMS. 
ROSALIND WILLIAMSON 




A GROUP OF "PREPS." 




c» 



<^p- 



Preparatory Roll. 



B. ADICKES. 
B. ALBRIGHT. 
C. BAINBRIDGE. 
C. BENEDICT. 
K. BLACKNALL. 
M. CATES. 



J. GILMEE. 
C. HARRIS. 
A. HARRIS. 
E. JACKSON. 
J. JONES. 
L. JOYNER. 



M. M. CHAMBERLAIN. M. KOINER. 
J. CHAPMAN. R. MANN. 

M. COOPER. E. MANN. 

R. DAVIS. D. MEARES. 

M. FEREBEE. I. MORGAN. 

M. EBERHARDT. K. OVERMAN 
M. GWYNN. M. POWELL. 
P. GRIFFITH. 



M. POOL. 
I. PRICE. 
K. ROGERS. 
I. ROGERSON. 
G. SHAW. 
L. M. SABISTON. 
M. SHUFORD. 
M. SMITH. 
A. STOKES. 
M. WELLS. 
J. WEST. 
A. WHITAKER. 
M. WILDER. 
A. WOOD. 



(From the Cerman of Goethe.) 

The Brooklet. 

" O little brook so bright and clear, 
Why always haste you so? " 
I stand upon the brink and ask, 
" Whence come, and whither go? " 

"I spring from out the rock's cool depth, 
Through greenest moss and flowers I wind, 
And mirrored on my shimmering breast 
The fleecy clouds of heaven you find.; 

" With childlike faith I ripple on 

And care not whither, far or wide ; 

'Tis God who called me from the stone, 

And He, I trust, will be my guide." 

M. Mackay. 



The Straight Road. 

Keep in de straight road day by day, 

A-singin' of yo' song ; 
Wen de harricane hits yo, tank de Lawd 

De earf-quake didn' come 'long ! 

Keep in de straight road's what I say, 

Wen de sky is frownin' black ; 
Wen de lightnin' come wid de thunder-drum, 

Keep out ub de lightnin' track. 

Keep in de straight road — young en gray, 
'Twell you say ter de yuther side — 

Wen de curtin drop, en de chariot stop— 
" I ready ter take dat ride." 

I. Claek. 



Sigma Lambda Literary Society. 

Motto : Lit with the sun. 
Flower : Yellow Jessamine. Colors : Purple and Gray. 

Officers, 1905-06. 
President, . . . VIRGINIA BAILEY. 

Vice-President, SUE PEINCE. 

Secretary, JANE IREDELL GREEN. 

Cor. Secretary, . . LEONORE SEAY. 

Treasurer, .... EMILY CARRISON. 

Critic, .... JOSEPHINE BOYLAN. 

Historian, .... SERENA BAILEY. 

Tellers, A. CORBETT, M. ELDREDGE, 

B. SPRINGS, H. STRANGE. 
Roll. 



ALBRIGHT. 
ASHE. 
ATKINSON. 
BAILEY, S. 
BAILEY, V. 
BOWEN. 
BOYLAN. 
CARRISON. 
CARTER. 
CHAPMAN. 
COOPER, G. 
CORBETT. 
CREWS. 
CROSSWELL. 
DAVIS, A. 
deROSSETT. 
DISOSWAY 



DuBOSE, M. 
ELDREDGE. 
EMERSON. 
GARY. 
GREEN. 
GREGORY. 
HALES. 
HENDERSON. 
HUTCHISON. 
JENNINGS. 
JONES. 
KLINGENSMTTH. 
KOINEE. 
LEE. E. 
LIDDELL. 
LONDON. 
MACKAY. 

Honorary Members. 



McGWIGAN. 
MILLER, V. 
PRINCE. 
ROBINSON. 
ROSSER. 
SEAY. 
SHELBURN. 
SHORT. 
SIMMONS. 
SPRINGS. 
SPRUTLL. 
STRANGE. 
WHITAKE^. G. 
WEBB. 
WILLIAMS. 
WILSON. 
WINSTON. 



Mb. DuBOSE. 
Mes. DuBOSE. 
Miss DOWD. 
Miss FENNER. 
Miss MEARES. 
Miss PIXLEY 
Mrs. SANBORN. 
Miss SAUNDERS. 

34 



Mr. SANBORN. 
Mrs. SEAY. 
Miss SHIPP. 
Mr. STONE. 
Miss SUTTON. 
Miss THOMAS. 
Mrs. ANDERSON. 



The Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society. 



Motto : Where high thoughts are duty. 



Flower : Wild Rose. 



Colors: Old Rose and Sage- 



Off 



icers, 1905 



,06. 



President, SARA GERTRUDE SULLIVAN. 
Vice-President, JESSIE PAGE HARRIS. 

Recording Sec'y, FRANCES ELIZABETH WOOLF. 

Corresponding Sec'y, EMMA ELLIOTTE BARNWELL. 
Treasurer, LOTTIE SHARPE. 

Critic, LILLIAN HAUSER FARMER. 

Historian, ANNIE WHITNER SLOAN. 
Tellers, LUCY PRIDE HEYWARD, 

RUTH FOSTER. 



RUTH BATCHELDER. 
HELEN BALL. 
LAURA BAKER. 
EMMA BARNWELL. 
HEBER BIRDSONG. 
MATTIE BRIGMAN. 
ELIZABETH BRYAN. 
MARY BRYAN. 
KATIE BaKBEE. 
MARY GRIMES COWPER. 
ELLA CROFT. 
ELLEN DUVALL. 
NANCY PAIRLEY. 



Miss LEE. 

Miss McKIMMON. 
Miss HULL. 



LILLIAN FARMER. 
RUTH FOSTER. 
LOUISE GADSDEN. 
LALLA HAMLET. 
JESSIE HARRIS. 
LUCY HEYWARD. 
LOUISE HILL. 
FANNIE JOHNSON. 
ANNIE KOONCE. 
ROWENA LEE. 
HAZLE MIDDLETON. 
JLNNIE MORRIS. 
NANNIE MOORE. 

Honorary. 

Mrs. IRVINE. 

BISHOP BRATTON. 

Miss WALTON. 



MARY PERRY. 
VIRGINIA SAUNDERS. 
FRANKIE SELF. 
LOTTIE SHARPE. 
ANNIE SLOAN. 
GERTRUDE SULLIVAN. 
MARJORIE ROBERTSON. 
EVA ROGERSON. 
HARRIET RUFF. 
ELIZABETH WADDILL. 
GRACE WARD. 
ANNA WAUGH. 
BETTIE WOOLF. 



Miss CRIBBS. 

Miss MASCH. 

Miss SANBORN. 



For a pupil to be eligible to this Society it is necessary to make an average of 90 per cent in 
scholarship. 



To a Young Girl. 

From your window, dear, 
You can watch the river, 

Blessing with its gentle voice 
The Almighty giver. 

May he keep your soul 

As calm and free from care 

As the brightest sparkling waive 
Dancing over there. 



S. C. 



A Serenade. 



The dreamy rose-buds grow most sweet 

Under Milady's casement wide, 
And their pure petals blush as though, 

With the sun's last beams they're dyed; 

Yet what can the sweetest of roses be 

Compared, sweetheart, with my love for thee. 

The night winds sigh and whisper low, 

As loath most loath to part 
With the tender vines that cling to the wall 

As love must cling to the heart. 
And even the smallest breeze from the sea 
Is laden with love, dear one, for thee. 

The stars above look wondering down, 

And shine ah! far more bright, 
As they keep a tender watch o'er you 

Through all the long, long night — 
But darker than starless night would be 

My life, if parted, dear heart from thee 

M. DdB. 



gJORORITlE 1 ^ 




JVIpJja Kappa pat. 

(gamma Srta §tgma. 
Kappa l*tta. 

IpaUmt l*tta. 



Alplja 2Cappa #at. 

(Samma Srta gngma. 
ICappa If lta. 

ItpHtkitt Irlln. 




-mrmrm 





Alpha Kappa Psi. 

Founded and Chartered at St. Mary's, 1900. 
Nationalized, 1904. 

ALPHA CHAPTER, St. Mary's. Raleigh. N. C. 

BETA CHAPTER. Virginia Female Institute, Staunton, Va. 

TAU CHAPTER. Fairmont School, Monteagle, Tenn. 

ALPHA CHAPTER. 

Colors : Blue and Gold. 
Flower : Forget-me-not. 

Soror in Facilitate. 

Eleanor W. Thomas. 

Sorores in Academia. 

Virginia Empie Bailey. 

Alice Witherspoon Corbett. 

Jessie deCottes Croswell. 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose. 
Margaret Eldredge. 

Elise Emerson. 
Virginia Miller. Louise Hill. 

Marjorie Robertson. Sara Haigh Jones. 

Marguerite Ashley Short. 

Margaret Gray Stedman. 
Helen Strange. 

Elizabeth Turner Waddill. 

Grace Buxton Whitaker. 




nirfios 




Gamma Beta Sigma. 



Founded 1901 . 



Chartered 1904. 



ALPHA CHAPTER, St. Mary's School. Raleigh. N. C. 
BETA CHAPTER. Baltimore, Md. 

GAMMA CHAPTER, Columbia Institute, Columbia. Term. 



Flower : Violet. 



ALPHA CHAPTER. 



Roll. 



Colors: Purple and Gold. 



Isabel Hamilton Clark. Sara Gertrude Sullivan. 

Jane Iredell Green. Grace Martin Ward. 

Frances Johnson McRee. Miss L. H. Lee. 

Eloise Robinson. 



Founded 1897. 



ALPHA, 
GAMMA, 
DELTA. 
THBTA, 
SIGMA, . 
PHI PHI, 
ZETA, . 
PHI DELTA, 
KAPPA ALPHA, 
RHO OMEGA PHI, 



Kappa Delta. 



Roll of Chapters. 



Chartered 1902. 



Virginia State Normal. Farmuille, Va. 

Hollins Institute, Hoilins, Va. 

College for Women, Columbia, S. C. 

Randolph- Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, Va. 

Gunston Hall, Washington, D. C. 

Fairmont Seminary, Washington, D. C. 

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Florida State College, Tallahassee. Fla. 

Judson College, Marion, Ala. 



PHI DELTA CHAPTER. 

Soror in Facultate. 

Charlotte Kendall Hull. 

Sorores in Academia. 
Josephine Engelhard Boylan. 
Katharine Boylan. 

Mary Christine Klingensmith. 

Jennie VanHoose Morris. 
Sue Brent Prince. 

Julia Conally Rosser. 
Lottie Sharp. 

Marion Winslow Slocomb. 

Blandina Baxter Springs. 
Maria Hill Webb. 

Annie Cordelle Wells. 

Julia Primrose Winston. 

Frances Elizabeth Woolf. 



Upsilon Delta. 



Founded 1902. Chartered 1904. 

Colors : Red and Gold. 
Flower: Poppy. 

EMMA ELLIOT BARNWELL Sumter, S. C 

EMILY JORDAN CARRISON, .... Camden. S. C 
AGNES MORGAN CARTER, .... Asheuille, N. C. 
EMILY HEYWARD CLARKSON, . . . Columbia, S. C 

FLORENCE ELLA CROFT, Aiken, S. C. 

Miss MARTHA AUSTIN DOWD, . ■ . Raleigh, N. C. 
LILLIAN HA USER FARMER, .... Florence, S. C. 
LOUISE THOMPSON GADSDEN, ■ Summeruille. S. C. 
MARY KATHARINE HENDERSON. . . Asheuille. N C. 
MARY THORNTON LASSITER, . . . Hertford, N. C. 

Miss KATE McKIMMON, Raleigh. N. C. 

MARGARET WILSON, Rock Hill, S. C. 




AT-HL.ET1C 




The Athletic Organization. 

"The object of the Association is to foster interest in out-door life, and to that end to en- 
courage all desirable forms of out-door games and exercise." 

"An Athletic Committee of seven will manage the affairs of the Association. This com- 
mittee is composed of the President and Secretary-Treasurer of the Association, the Directors 
of the several Clubs, and two members from the Faculty." 

The Athletic Committee. 

MAEGAEET ELDEEDGE, President of Association. 

CHEISTINE KLINGENSMITH Secretary-Treasurer of the Association. 

LUCY HEYWAED Director of the Basket Ball Club. 

EMMA BAENWELL Director of the Walking Clnb. 

JOSEPHINE BOYLAN, . . Director of the Tennis Club. 
Miss CEIBBS. Mb. CEUIKSHANK. 

40 




THE BASKET BALL TEAM. 



Fowards. Centres. 

M. COOPER. J. CROSWELL. 

E. CLARKSON. L. HAMLET. 

L. HEYWARD (Captain). J. HARRIS. 
C. KLINGENSMITH. V. SAUNDERS. 



Guards. 

S. PRINCE. 
K. GARY. 
M. ELDRIDGE. 
A. CORliETT. 



Side-Centres. 

M. SLOCOMB. 
E. CROFT. 
M. WILDER. 









Ifc 




l^feppite 








Basket Ball Club. 



ALSTON. 
BREEDEN. 
BENEDICT. 
BARNWELL. 
BAINBRIDGE. 
BATTLE. 
CROFT. 
CLARKSON. 
COOPER, M. 
CORBETT. 
deROSSET. 



DAVIS. 
ELDREDGE. 

FEREBEE. 
FISHER. 
GANT. 
GARY. 
GREGORY. 
HAMLET. 



HEYWARD (Capt.) 
JONES, S. 



LONDON. 
MILLER, V. 
MORRIS. 
PERRY, B. 
PERRY, M. 
POWELL. 
PRINCE. 
ROBINSON. 
ROBERTSON, 
SHELBURN. 



SAUNDERS. 
SEAY. 
SMITH, M. 
SULLIVAN. 
SPRUILL. 
STOKES. 
WELLS, A. 
WELLS, M. 
0. WINSTON. 

WILLIAMS. 



KLINGENSMITH. 



Walking Club. 



ALSTON. 
BARNWELL (Capt.) 
BAINBRIDGE. 
BREEDEN. 
BENEDICT. 
BATTLE. 
CLARKSON. 
COOPER, M. 
CORBETT. 
CROFT. 
DAVIS. 
deROSSET. 



FEREBEE. 
. FISHER. 
GARY. 
GREEN. 
GREGORY. 
HAMLET. 
HEYWARD. 
HUTCHISON. 
JONES, S. 
KLINGENSMITH 
LASSITER. 



LONDON. 
McCULLERS. 
MILLER, V. 
MORRIS. 
PERRY, B. 
PERRY, M. 
POWELL. 
PRINCE. 
ROBERTSON.. 
ROBINSON. 
SHARP. 



SLOCOMB. 
SAUNDERS. 
SHELBURN. 
SEAY. 
STOKES. 
SULLIVAN. 
SPRUILL. 
WELLS, A. 
0. WELLS, M. 

LIDDELL. 
SMITH, M. 



Tennis Club. 



ATKINSON. 
BAKER. 
BAINBRIDGE. 
BAILEY, S. 
BAILEY, V. 
BATTLE. 
BENEDICT. 
BRYAN, M. 
CLARK. 
COHEN. 
CORBETT. 
CROFT. 
CARRISON. 



deROSSET. 
DISOSWAY. 
DuBOSE, M. 
ELDREDGE. 
FARMER. 
FEREBEE. 
GARY. 
GREGORY. 
HALES. 
HARRIS, J. 
HAMLET. 
HEYWARD. 
HENDERSON. 
41 



KLINGENSMITH. 
KOINER. 
LONDON. 
McGWIGAN 
MEWBORN. 
MILLER, V. 
MOORE. 
OVERMAN. 
PERRY, M. 
PERRY, B. 
POWELL. 
PRINCE. 
ROBERTSON. 



ROBINSON. 
RUFF. 

STRANGE (Capt.). 
SMITH. 
SPRINGS. 
SLOAN. 
SPRUILL. 
SHUFORD. 
SMITH. 
WARD. 
WINSTON. 
WEBB. 
WELLS. 




The Sketch Club. 

Miss FENNER, Critic. 

LEONORE SEAY President. 

JENNIE MORRIS, Vice-President. 

SERENA BAILEY, .... Secretary-Treasurer. 



Colors : Yellow and White. 



Flower : Daisy. 



Motto : Art is Power. 



HELEN ALSTON. JENNIE MORRIS. 

NELL ATKINSON. BLISS PERRY. 

SERENA BAILEY. OLIVE ROBERTSON. 

HELEN BREEDEN. ELOISE ROBINSON. 

MARY COOPER. LEONORE SEAY. 

ELISE EMERSON. MILDRED SMITH. 

ESTELLE FARRIOR HELEN STRANGE. 

T.AT.T.A HAMLET. MARION SLOCOMB. 

JESSIE HARRIS. MARGARET WILSON. 

IRVING MORGAN. 



42 



SjtffrJvGJyJj 




The St. Mary's Glee Club. 





ist Mandolin. 

KLINGENSMITH. 
EMERSON. 



ist Violin. 

WILSON. 

LEE. 

DuBOSE. 



2nd Mandolin. 

PRINCE. 

MEARES. 

SPRINGS. 

2nd Violin. 

MILLER. 

WINSTON. 
SLOCOMB. 



Guitar. 

TAYLOR. 

HULL (Director). 




The Altar Guild. 

Director, Miss MoKIMMON. 

President, MARY T. LASSITER. 

Treasurer, LILLIAN H. FARMER. 

SERENA C. BAILEY. JANE IREDELL GREEN. 

MARY S. C. BRYAN. HARRIETTE E. RUFF. 

EMILY J. CARRISON. ANNIE W. SLOAN. 

LILLIAN H. FAliMER. MARY J. SPRUILL. 

RUTH FOSTER GERTRUDE SULLIVAN. 

ALICE McCULLERS. FRANCES E. WOOLF. 



The Auxiliary at St. Mary's. 

WOMAN'S BRANCH. 

Miss WALTON, President. Miss SUTTON, Vice-President. 

Miss McKIMMON, Secretary. Miss SHIPP, Treasurer. 

JUNIOR BRANCH. 

St. Catharine's Chapter. St. Elizabeth's Chapter. 

Miss THOMAS, Directress. Miss MEARES, Directress. 

MARY LASSITER President. EMMA BARNWELL. 

MARY BRYAN Vice-President. MARGARET WILSON. 

VIRGINIA BAILEY. . . . Secretary. MYRTLE DISOSWAY. 
LOUISE HILL Treasurer. MYRTLE DISOSWAY. 

St. Etheldreda's Chapter. St. Monica's Chapter. 

Mrs. DuBOSE, Directress. Miss McKIMMON, Directress. 

EMILY CARRISON President. NANCY FAIRLEY. 

MARGARET ELDREDGE. Vice-President. ELIZABETH WATTS. 

EULA GREGORY Secretary. JESSIE CROSWELL. 

VIRGINIA MILLER. . . . Treasurer. CORINNA GANT. 

St. Anne's Chapter. St. Margaret's Chapter. 

Miss SUTTON, Directress. Miss CRIBBS, Directress. 

LOTTIE SHARP President. JENNIE MORRIS. 

ALICE DAVIS Vice-President. LOUISE GADSDEN. 

LINA deROSSET Secretary. JULIA McINTYRE. 

FRANCES LEE Treasurer. JULIA McINTYRE. 



A Rhyme of the Seniors. 



A 
B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

I 

J 

K 

L 

M 

N 



P 

Q 
R 

S 
T 
U 

V 

w 



s for Annie, who isn't very bright ; 

s for Birds — a Snipe, maybe, at night ; 

s for Chapel — we're there most all the time ; 

s for Diploma (that'll ruin any rhyme); 

s for " Ears open " at a lecture or so ; 

s for Foster, Muse editor, you know ; 

s for Green (true in only one sense); 

s for History, so hard to condense ; 

s for Infirmary — where hard days we go ; 

s for June — when our school days will be o'er ; 

s for Koonce, a quiet Senior lass ; 

s for Lassiter, laziest of the class ; 

s for Mackay, and our Motto as well ; 

s for Nothing — (or nothing I can spell) ; 

s for Order, which we try so hard to keep ; 

s for the Pleasure that from learning we shall reap ; 

s for Qualms and Quizzes — Oh dearl 

s for Ruff, with a suitor minus hair. 

s for Sullivan who loves Hist'ry 'tis said ; 

s for Tears at parting we shall shed ; 

s for Us, the Class of Naughty Six ; 

s for the Volumes I could tell you of our tricks ; 

s for Woolf ; as X and Y and Z 

Rhymesters find difficult, such rhymesters as we, 

She, with our compliments, as they run in so fast, 

Presents them very kindly to the Junior Class. 

A. W. S. 



To South Carolina and Her Sister. 

Here's to the state of palmettoes ; 
Here's to the state which vanquished foes ; 
Here's to the state of valiant sons, 
Here's to her women, the noblest ones ; 
Here's to the grandest state on earth — 
Carolina ! 

Here's to the battles she has won ; 
Here's to the duty she's ever done ; 
Here's to her rights she's ever claimed, 
Here's to her honor she's ever maintained. 
Here's to the grandest state on earth — 
Carolina ! 

Here's to the flag for which she fought ; 
Here's to her bravest who victory wrought ; 
Here's to her love for one, her mate ; 
Here's to her sister, the Old North State , 
Here's to the grandest state on earth — 
Carolina ! 

H. Brekdkn, '09. 



The South Carolina Club. 

Colors : Garnet and Black. Emblem : Palmetto. 

Motto : Dum Spiro Spero. 

President EMMA ELLIOTT BARNWELL. 

Vice-President MARGARET ELDREDGE. 

Corresponding Secretary, LUCY PRIDE HEYWARD. 

Treasurer ANNIE WHITNER SLOAN. 

Members. 

HELEN ALSTON, Jb. EMILY HEYWARD CLARKSON. 

EMMA ELLIOTT BARNWELL. BEATRICE BOLLMAN COHEN. 

RUTH BATCHELDER. ALICE WITHERSPOON CORBETT. 

HELEN FERGUSSON BREEDEN. FLORENCE ELLA CROFT. 

ELIZABETH SHERROD BRYAN. ELLEN KOLLOCK DUVALL. 

EMILY JORDAN CARRISON. NATHALIE DOTTERER. 

MARGARET ELDREDGE. ANNA PEYRE MOORE. 

LILLIAN HAUSER FARMER. MAY IRVING MORGAN. 

LOUISE THOMPSON GADSDEN. MARJORIE ROBERTSON. 

LUCY PRIDE HEYWARD. OLIVE ROBERTSON. 

ETHEL HUNNICUTT. HARRIETTE ELIZABETH RUFF. 

GLADYS EDNA HUFF. VIRGINIA SAUNDERS. 

LILLIAN SHINGLER HUGHES. ANNIE WHITNER SLOAN. 

JESSIE BULLOCK JENNINGS. ELIZABETH TURNER WADDILL. 

FRANCES HAYS LEE. ELIZABETH WATTS. 

JULIA LOUISE McINTYRE. ANNIE CORDELLE WELLS. 

DOROTHY KIRK MEARES. MARY ALICE WELLS. 

LOIS HAZLEHURST MIDDLETON. MARGARET B. WILSON. 




The Dramatic Club. 



President, JOSEPHINE BOYLAN. 

MARGARET ELDKIDGE. CHRISTINE KLIXdEXSMITH. 

JANE IREDELL GREEN. SARA GERTRUDE SULLIVAN. 

JENNIE vanIIOOSE .MORRIS. FRANCES ELIZABETH WOOLF. 



The Spectator on Mashes. 

Having often received an invitation from my friend, the Rev. McNeely DuBose, to pase 
away a month with him at St. Mary's, I last week accompanied him thither and am settled 
with him for some time at his suburban school, where I intend to form several of my ensuing 
speculations. This agreeable seat is surrounded with so many pleasing walks which are 
struck out of the grove, in the midst of which the school stands, that one can never be 
weary of rambling from one labyrinth of delight to another. I will be more particular on 
this matter in a future paper, fcr the first and most obvious reflections which arise in a man 
who changes the city for such a life, are upon the different manners of the people. 

So here, in the first place, I must observe the conduct of that class which is so prominent 
among the maids of the old institution — the "mashes." The unique name and the manners 
of the various types of the class cannot but be of some interest to you at the Club, and 
most especially to my friend, Will Honeycomb, who, though he may rally me upon my 
"country diversions/' will not fail to listen eagerly to anything concerning the " fair sex." 

When first I came here the meaning of this word mash puzzled me considerably — the 
classics threw no light upon the subject — and so I found I must work out the meaning for 
myself as best I could. An opportunity was soon given. While strolling in the leafy 
grove the other day listening to the warbling of the innumerable birds, I heard of a sudden 
a rustling noise of petticoats fleeing as if pursued, and turned, expecting to see one of the 
gentle maidens chased by a mad bull or some animal equally as fierce, but I saw only two 
very comely older girls walking along chatting gaily. I continued my walk, having decided 
that the little creature I had seen must be suffering from some mental infirmity, when I 
heard one of the girls say, "I tell you, your mash has it bad. Why she nearly broke her 
neck getting away from you just now." Then the meaning seemed clear — a mash was one 
who fled as if pursued when another came near. 

To be such a timorous creature seemed to me most distressing, and I lay awake long 
that night pitying the little maid and wondering if some of our famous doctors of medicine 
could not cure her. Indeed I was so much disturbed over the little girl's state of mind that, 
contrary to my custom, I next morning enquired of my old friend concerning her state of 
health and found that she was most happy and sane when not near her "Mash." 

My mind had been fully made up as to what characterizes one mash when another 
type was presented to me. I was walking alone in the moonlight thinking how our good 
friend, Sir Roger, if he had been here, would have been discoursing on his perverse widow, 
for the moonlight like the grove is settled upon her, when I suddenly heard the sound of 
voices near by. As I came nearer I caught words of the deepest feeling and most passionate 
love, and thinking it to be some country pair who had been attracted there by the beauty of 
the place continued my walk. Soon I heard in the sweetest of maiden voices, "You most 
adorable of girls — you precious angel! my loved one! my mash! " I understood all then 

49 



and crept away for fear of disturbing such deep devotion, but not before the sound of 
many and ardent kisses came to my ears. My definition for the Mash then could not be true, 
for here was a "Mash" who did not flee from the object — nay, she held the loved one in the 
closest of embraces and imprinted the most fervent of kisses upon her brow. 

The next day, still other forms were developed! First, the serving type: this Mash 
is the most competent of domestics, and I advise my lady of Fashion to get a Mash and 
then hire her for her maid if she would have the best and most willing of service — for the 
Mash cheerfully performs the every wish and then asks if she may not do more. Then, there 
is the weeping type: this is the most pathetic and the most depressing of the types, for 
everywhere you turn is heard the bitter wail of some poor victim who is in such great 
tribulation because the morning kiss has not been bestowed or for some similar grievous 
reason. 

I have shown you the great types — the fleeing type, the fervent kissing type, the serving 
type and the weeping type, which all differ very materially each from the other, but which 
in one respect are the same — that of perpetual giving. It would take a dozen speculations 
to enumerate the number and variety of the gifts which are joyfully bestowed by the starv- 
ing Mash. 

I have been more particular on this account, because I hear that there is scarce a 
school in the country in which this peculiar malady does not prevail in all its various 
forms, and it is my opinion that the poor maids must be Buffering from some serious mental 
irregularity which the parents should not fail to take note of. 

"A SEmoE." 



Arranged Under Difficulties. 

Girl at telephone talking to A. & M, boy. Mr. DuBose walking in, the girl has to 
pretend to be talking to her brother, but can't let the boy know it. 

Girl— "Hello." 

A. & M.— "This is Bill." 

Girl — "Why, Jack! when did you get here? How's mother?" 

A. & M. — Beg pardon. There must be some mistake. This is William Smith and I 
want to speak to " 

Girl — "This is me, Jack." 

A. & M. (stiffly) — "You misunderstand. Is that St. Mary's?" 

Girl — "Yes. What are you doing here?" 

A. & M. (agitatedly) — "This is A. & M. and I wish you'd call Miss — ■ " 

Girl — "Well, go ahead, Jack. I'm listening." 

A. & M. (exasperatedly) — "If you'll tell me who you are and what that fellow Jack's 
name is, maybe I can find him for you." 

Girl— "Grand! Go on." 

A. & M. (gruffly) — "Aw! cut all that out. Who are you and who do you think you 
are talking to?" 

Girl — "Brother, you haven't really got to go so soon?" 

A. & M. (dumfoundedly) — "Holy Moses! This is the first I ever heard of haying a 
sister." (Impatiently) "I'll let you have the 'phone all day if you'll only let me speak to 
Miss " 

Girl — "Mr. DuBose is right here in the office. I'll ask him." 

(To Mr. DuBose) — "Can brother come over to see me to-night?" 

Mr. DuBose — "Yes, daughter, if you weren't absent from that Saturday lecture." 

A. & M. (growing enlightened) — "Oh — h — h!! I see. You carried it off fine" (laugh- 
ing) — "So it's you, Sister Nan. Is it?" 

Girl — "I'm mighty glad we've got the connection right at last. I've had an awful time 
making you understand me." 

A. & M. (chuckling) — "I reckon you have. How about that dance Monday night?" 

Girl — "I'm afraid I couldn't get permission to be out so late. We have to be in by 
half-past five, you know." 

A. & M. — "Hang permission! Come on and go. Mothers going to chaperone. It won't 
be a thing." 

Girl (enthusiastically) — "Is mother really coming up?" 

A. & M. (roaring) — "Sure." (Convincingly): "It'll be perfectly all right for you 
to do it." 

51 



Girl (in excited uncertainty) — "How could I?" 

A. & M. — "Listen here! Mother's carriage can wait on the edge of the grove, and I'll 
come up and meet you. You see that'll be still more proper." 

Girl (with anxious interest) — "But how about mother?" 

A. & M. — "Oh, that's easy. You know she'd love to chaperone you." 

Girl— "Fine. But— er— " 

A. & M. (urgently) — "Oh, come on, Nan. It'll be first rate sport and you know I 
wouldn't ask you to do anything that wasn't all right." 

Girl — "Of course — but — (decidedly), All right! (Remembering Mr. DuBose. ) What 
time did you say you'd be up, Jack?" 

A. & M. (delightedly) — "Good for you. I'll be up about nine-thirty, if that suits you." 

Mr. DuBose — "Haven't you all talked long enough ?" 

Girl — "All right, sir. Good-bye, Jack." 

A. & M. — "Good-bye; don't forget." 

Girl — "I won't; good-bye." H. S. & S. B. P. 



The Attempt. 



Ah! the sorrow in my heart that day, 

As I walked beside the brook, 
To write a poem was my task. 

Without the help of book. 

"As the dreary rain came pouring down," 

Ah! a thought has come at last; 
Now for at least another line 

To help me with my task. 

But the brook flowed on with jingling sound, 

So I could not think a bit, 
''The girl was sweet and good and fair, 

Her face with joy was lit." 

At last I had begun my poem, 

To finish was the trouble. 
Oh I could only watch the brook, 

And hear that bubble, bubble! 

Then into the brook I threw my pen; 

My attempt had come to naught; 
Now when you write a poem, friend, 

Avoid the brook you ought. IL Baix, *07. 

52 



Extracts from a St. Mary's Girl's Diary. 

Sunday, October 1 . — / got back here a week ago Thursday, and every thing looks 
about the same. There have been some improvements and the Grove is very pretty. I was 
feeling awfully homesick to-night after roll-call, and to make things worse, everywhere I would 
turn there would be a new girl weeping; so a crowd of us decided that we had better try to 
make things livelier. About ten of us got together and took several out snipe hunting, and two 
of the victims were Seniors! 

t&& ^?* <&* 

October 20. — We surely have had a fine time this week — Fair Week — that explains 
itself. We had school on Monday, giving us Wednesday and Thursday holiday. Wednesday we 
went out and took in all the sights, though Thursday was the big day on account of the Presi- 
dent's being here. On that day we all stood out by the Summer House and gave the Harvard 
yell as the President passed, and how he did smile! To-morrow night the Sigma Lambda give 
a reception to their new members. 

November 1- — Night before last Mrs. Irvine and Miss Cribbs gave a Faculty 
Recital, which we all enjoyed very much. We are down to hard work now, but we had a little 
fun last week when we went to the U. N. C.-A. & M. football game. It was about the most 
exciting game I ever saw, and besides that, almost everybody in North Carolina seemed to me 
to be there. Last night was Hallowe'en. I wonder whether Miss Checkley was thinking of 
us. Miss Fenner did the honors this time and great was Jarley and Slum and Little Nell and 
the figures. 

November 30. — Well, I have been to about a dozen feasts to-day and am invited to 
another to-night. This month has been very gay. First, Miss Katie's Dormitory gave a 
Japanese Tea — then there was "Maidens All Forlorn," and the "Grasshopper Cantata," and 
last night the E. A. P. Society gave its annual reception. 



December 19. — Just think, I'm all packed up to go home. Never was so excited. 
There has been so much lately that time has just been flying. First, St. Etheldreda' s Chapter 
gave "Up to Freddie," and on the 16th the Seniors gave "Cranford." Can't write any 
more, am so excited over going home. We have all given each other our presents, and so it 
really seems like Christmas is already here. Good-bye, old book, till after I come back. 
Hurrah ! 

January 1 3. — Just to think, that all the fun is over and nothing to look forward to 
but those awful exams which are coming in a few days. I know I am going to have nervous 
prostration and fail on every one. 

January 3 1 . — Well, all the exams are over, and much to my surprise I am still here, 
but must confess there's not much sense left. The night after the exams were over we went 
to hear Sousa, and I can't express how much I enjoyed it. The only thing that could have 
made it more enjoyable would have been permission to dance to "Stars and Stripes" forever. 
Last night we went to the A. & M. Glee Club. 

March 1 . — Lent is here, so of course we are not having any entertainments. On the 
12th of last month we went to hear Bispham, whom after the concert we had the pleasure of 
meeting. The Seniors have been having a fine time lately. First, on the 14th, Miss Thomas 
gave them and the Certificate pupils a most delightful reception. On the 1 7th the Juniors 
entertained them at a "Heart Party." On the afternoon of the 22nd, Virginia Bailey, Gertrude 
Sullivan and Jane Iredell Green entertained them at a Washington Tea, and that night they 
went to a play at Peace Institute and the next night to a reception at B. U. W, given by Miss 
Abbott. We are all working now making clothes for some little child at an orphanage. 

April 20. — Maybe its because this is my last year — I don't know — but I can never 
remember everything about here being so lovely in spring. The birds never sang so sweetly 
before, the grove never was so shady, the flowers never were so sweet or the girls so 
jolly; I feel as if I could just live here forever. After Easter, entertainment followed enter- 
tainment, baseball games, certificate recitals, the Dramatic Club play, and several informal 
receptions given to the Seniors. 

5) 





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Home. — // is mighty good to be at home again, I tell you, but still there comes up a 
mighty big lump in my throat when I begin talking about all those good times we used to have — 
for euerthing but the nice things are forgotten. Commencement was just the same dear, sad 
Commencement — and yet seemed so different. We were in such a rush that week that nobody 
had time to think — the recitals, the receptions, the class-day exercises and the Commencement 
Day, when the Valedictory had been read and we were flying homeward before we realized 
that it was all over. Away back in January we had been counting the hours before Commence- 
ment, and here it had come and gone before I realized it. I moved over into a dark corner 
of my seat just to have one good, long cry about all those dear girls I was leaving — all those 
dear old trees in the — Oh ! thank the goodness! Mama is calling me, for I really believe I 
would have been crying in two seconds. 





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"EVEa-f V.ITTJ.E BIT HELPS 



W. M. T. E. 

Motto : My name is Jimmy, I take all you gimme. 
Flower : Celery. Colors : Turkey Eed and Orange. 

Pass Word : Something Doing. 

VIRGINIA BAILEY Water Carrier. >' 

JOSEPHINE BOYLAN. . .Pitcher Drinker. 

JANE IREDELL GREEN Stirrer. 

LOUISE HILL Silent Member. 

JULIA ROSSER Bottle Washer. 

GERTRUDE SULLIVAN Chief Cook. 

*GRACE WHITAKER. . . . Toast Mistress. 

FRANCES E. WOOLF Taster. 

Honorary Members. 

BLACKBURN, L. ADDERTON, J. 

LYNCH, H. JOHNSON, C. 

CROW, W. LANE, H. 

NADING, W. "UNCLE." 

Time of Meeting. 
When we are not all dead broke. 

Place. 

Where there are no BUTTERS-IN around. 



'Expelled because she went home and would't send us anything. 

57 




Happy Hooligans. 



Object : A Good Time. 



Flower : Jimson Weed. 



Day : April Fool. 



"MONKEY" CEOFT. 
"KIT" MOORE. 

"SLUM" BARNWELL. 



"RIX" WILSON. 

"JACK" HEY WARD. 




U. DL. L. 







w.-^»i <x»uVr^« wjW^.E^A^.* ftjTs 






KNDCK5 




Who does the best his circumstance allows, 

Does well, acts nobly; angels could no more. — The Editors. 

Now good digestion wait on appetite and health on both. — The W. M. T. E. 
The bed has become a place of luxury for me; I would not exchange it for all the 
thrones in the world. — Mary Lassiter. 



My tongue within my lips remain, 

For who talks much, must talk in vain. — L. 



Hill. 



All hope abandon ye who enter here. — Study Hall in examination week. 

Rare is the union of beauty and purity. — £. Bailey. 

A little nonsense now and then. — Joe and Jane. 

The great theatre for virtue is conscience. — S. Bailey. 

His bark is worse than his bite. — Mr. Cruikshank. 

Never say "Fail" again. — C. Latin class. 

Strange all this difference should be 

Twixt Tweedledum and Tweedledee. — M. and 0. Robertson. 

Pray take them, sir. Enough's a feast, 

Eat some, and packet up the rest. — Sunday night supper. 

My head is a dome for thought rather than a mattress for hair. — A. Sloan. 
There is occasions and causes why and wherefore in all things. — M. Disosicay. 

59 



Then he will talk — good gods! how he will talk. — H. Alston. 

Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part. — L. deRosset and S. Watkina. 

Then claap me round the neck once more, and give me one more kiss. — J. Chapman and 
M. Sanborn. 

In. notes by distance made more sweet. — "Skeet" and Sue (Mandolin). 

By Jupiter, an angel! or, if not, an earthly paragon. — Miss Thomas. 

God giveth quietness at last (?). — G. Hales. 

A careless song with a little nonsense in it, now and then, does not misbecome a mon- 
arch. — Ruff, Sloan and Foster. 

My only books 
Were Betty's looks, 
And love is all she taught us. — The Seven. 

Young fellows will be young fellows. — Wake Forest Seniors, 

Better late than never. — Gertrude Sullivan. 

Though this may be play to you, it is death to us. — Senior English. 

Charmed with the foolish whistling of a man. — Page Shelburn and Nell Atkinson. 

Nothing is impossible to industry. — Mamie Wilder. 

Yet will she blush, here be it said 

To hear her secret so betrayed. — Frankie Self. 

No rule without an exception. — "Sparrow" Gwyn. 

With thee conversing I forget all time. — Frances Lee and Lucy Heyward. 

The best laid schemes of mice and men 
Gang aft a'gley. — Betsey London. 

Fast asleep it is no matter. Enjoy the honey heavy dew of slumber. — C. Klingensmith 
and B. Springs. 

We must laugh, because we are happy. — Beatrice Cohen. 
Her hair is of a good color, an excellent color. — Annie Wells. 

When night hath set her silver lamp on high, 

Then is the time for study. — To those icho go to Evening Study-Hall. 

Their only labor was to kill time. — Maria Webb and Rowena Lee. v 
Speaks three or four languages, word for word, without book. — Mademoiselle Masch. 
She was more than over-shoes in love. — Nan Moore. 

If thou continuest to take delight in argumentation, thou mightest be qualified to 
combat with the sophists, but never know how to live with man. — Eula Gregory. 
Could I love less I should be happier. — Lina deRosset. 
Cheeks like the mountain pink. — Nathalie Dotterer. 
Whatever one does or says I must be good. — Leila May Sabistan, 
What is thine is mine, and all mine is thine. — Annie Sloan and Ret Ruff. 
I never dare to write as funny as I can. — Elnora Williams. 



Statistics (?) 

Best Student Isabel Clark; Helen Strange, second. 

Best Taught Class, . . . C Latin. 

Most Energetic, Mary Lassiter; M. Webb and R. Lee, tie. 

Worst Case of "Mash," Jessie Chapman and Margaret Sanborn. 

Greatest Flirt Serena Bailey; Jessie Jennings, second. 

Laziest Mary Bryan. 

Greatest Talker, Louise Hill— unanimous. 

Chief of Knockers, . . Serena Bailey. 

Fattest Girl Irving Morgan. 

Most Optimistic, .... Bland Bowen. 
Most Pessimistic, . . . Emma Barnwell. 

Thinnest Girl, Katharine Henderson. 

Most Welcome Mail, . . A Report Card. 



The Muse Editors. 

PRODUCERS OF THE ANNUAL. 

Editor-in-Chief, . . . RUTH FOSTER. 

Business Manager, . . . JANE IREDELL GREEN. 

i ANNIE E. KOONCE. 
MARGARET MACKAY. 
MARY THORNTON LASSITER. 
JOSEPHINE BOYLAN. 

r ANNIE WHITNER SLOAN. 
Art Editors, ......... -| HARRIET E. RUFF. 

( FRANCES ELIZABETH WOOLP. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE MONTHLY. 

Editorial Board. 

RUTH FOSTER, Chief. JANE I. GREEN, Business Manager. 

FRANCES E. WOOLF. 



Departments. 

r MARGARET MACKAY. 
Literary, . ] GERTRUDE SULLIVAN. Social, . 

( MARY T. LASSITER. 

Exchange: ANNIE W. SLOAN. Joke: HARRIET E. RUFF. 



' ANNIE E. KOONCE. 
. JOSEPHINE BOYLAN. 



Special Editors for the Spring Numbers. 

LILLIAN HAUSER FARMER, '07, Chief. 

February: MARGARET DtjBOSE, '05, and SERENA C. BAILEY. 

March: EMILY J. CARRISON, '07, and LOUISE HELL, '08. 

April: JESSIE P. HARRIS, '07, and SUE B. PRINCE. 

May: BEATRICE B. COHEN, '07, and MARY J. SPRUTLL. 




THE ANNUAL BOARD, 
1906. 



The Muse Editors. 



PRODUCERS OF THE ANNUAL. 



Editor-in-Chief, . . 
Business Manager, 



Literary Editors, 



Art Editors, 



RUTH FOSTER. 
. . JANE IREDELL GREEN. 

iAXXli: K, KOONCE. 
M I RGABJET MACKAY. 
MART THORNTON LASSITER. 
JOSEPHINE boylan. 

f AMU] ifNER SI/JAN. 

. . J BASSIST E. RUFF. 

( FRANCES ELIZABETH WOOLF. 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE MONTHLY 



RUTH FOSTER, Chief. 



Editorial Board. 

JANE I. GREEN, Business Manager. 
FRANCES E. WOOLF. 



Departments. 



Literary, 



r MARGARET MACKAY. 
3 GERTRUDE SULLIVAN. 



Social, 



( MARY T. LASSITER 
Exchange: ANNIE W. SLOAN. 



ANNIE E. KOONCE 
. JOSEPHINE BOYLAN. 



Joke: HARRIET E. RUFF. 



Special Editors for the Spring Numbers. 

LILLIAN HAUSER FARMER, 07, Chief. 

February: MARGARET DcBOSE, '05, and SERENA C. BAILEY. 

March: EMILY J. CARRISON, 07, and LOUISE HILL, '08. 

April: JESSIE P. HARRIS, '07, and SUE B. PRINCE. 

May: BEATRICE B. COHEN, '07, and MARY J. SPRUILL. 



THE ANNUAL BOARD, 
1906. 



The Making of The Muse. 

It happened once upon a time 

That certain folks did choose 
That we should write an annual, 

By name "St. Mary's Muse." 

They gave us pens and paper, too — 

And everything but time — 
And told us we must rack our brains, 

And write both prose and rhyme. 

They told us we must scurry 'round 

And get a lot of news 
Of every girl who's in the school, 

So she would buy that "Muse." 

They said that we were "dollars Bhort," 

And if no "ads" were placed 
That we would have no "Muse" at all, 

And the class would be disgraced. 

We've racked our brains; we've torn our hair; 

We've worked both night and day — 
But nothing very new or strange 

Has come across our way — 

Of old on Mount Parnassus high 

There were Muses nine, 'tis said; 
I'm not surprised they wore men out, 

And that "great Pan is dead." 

We envy not their golden lyres, 

Their laurels we decline; 
One "Muse" is now enough for us, 

We do not ask for nine. 

But still we've done our very best — 

No more could angels do — 
And how we have succeeded. 

To judge, we leave with you. 
L' Envoi. 
They blow us up, they set us down, 

And us do much abuse; 
I tell you we've been "seein' sights" 

In "The Making of the 'Muse.' " M. D. M-, '06. 

64 



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